Phone: 
+1 206 412-6372

Speech & Hearing Sciences
1417 NE 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98105
Office: 
EGL 165
Box: 
354875

Lesley
 
Olswang
,

Professor Emeritus
Education: 
University of Washington, PhD, Speech and Hearing Sciences,1978
University of Illinois, MS, Speech and Hearing Sciences, 1971
Northwestern University, BS, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1969
Academic Expertise: 
Child Language Development and Disorders
Social-Cultural Aspects of Communication
Early Intervention
Treatment Efficacy
Implementation Sciences
Honors & Awards: 
Honors, American Speech, Language, Hearing Association, 2016.
University of Washington, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Distinguished Alumnus, 2015.
University of Washington, Marsha Landolt Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award, 2005.
Fellow, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 1996.
Fulbright Research Scholar, University of Reading, Reading, U.K. and University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1994-1995..
University of Washington, Distinguished Teaching Award, 1983.
Editor's Award: American Journal of Speech, Language Pathology, 1995; Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools,1991; Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, 1986.

Dr. Lesley B. Olswang began her academic career at the University of Washington, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences in 1978.  She was promotoed to Associate Professor in 1985 and Full Professor in 1991. She servied as Associate Chair from 1995-2005.   She is currently a Professor Emeritus.  She has had extensive clinical and research experience with children with language disorders.  Her research has included two primary populations:  young school-age children and children below the age of three.  Her school-age research has examined the social communication of children diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome as they participate in classroom activities.  Dr. Olswang's research with children below the age of three has focused on  two specific populations: infants with severe physical disabilities and toddlers  with specific language impairment.  She has been investigating the benefits of treatment with these children and their families, particularly attempting to determine readiness factors that might predict when children and families will best benefit from different intervention options. The promising findings of this work has led to her current interests in implementation sciences.  Her research has been supported by grants from the University of Washington, the Washington State Association for Retarded Citizens, the US Department of Education, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control. 

Recent Publications
Moving Triadic Gaze Intervention Into Practice: Measuring Clinician Attitude and Implementation Fidelity. (2017 May 24) J Speech Lang Hear Res 60(5): 1285-1298 Feuerstein J, Olswang LB, Greenslade K, Pinder GL, Dowden P, Madden J

Practice-Based Research: Another Pathway for Closing the Research-Practice Gap. (2015 Dec) J Speech Lang Hear Res 58(6): S1871-82 Crooke PJ, Olswang LB

Bridging the Gap Between Research and Practice: Implementation Science. (2015 Dec) J Speech Lang Hear Res 58(6): S1818-26 Olswang LB, Prelock PA

Triadic gaze intervention for young children with physical disabilities. (2014 Oct) J Speech Lang Hear Res 57(5): 1740-53 Olswang LB, Dowden P, Feuerstein J, Greenslade K, Pinder GL, Fleming K

Validating dynamic assessment of triadic gaze for young children with severe disabilities. (2013 Aug) Am J Speech Lang Pathol 22(3): 449-62 Olswang LB, Feuerstein JL, Pinder GL, Dowden P